full-as-much-heart:

The Bone Clocks, David Mitchell
September 2014. It’s coming…
One drowsy summer’s day in 1984, teenage runaway Holly Sykes encounters a strange woman who offers a small kindness in exchange for ‘asylum’.  Decades will pass before Holly understands exactly what sort of asylum the woman was seeking…
THE BONE CLOCKS follows the twists and turns of Holly’s life, from a scarred adolescence in Gravesend to old age on Ireland’s Atlantic coast as Europe’s oil supply dries up – a life not so far out of the ordinary, yet punctuated by flashes of precognition, visits from people who emerge from thin air and brief lapses in the laws of reality.  For Holly Sykes – daughter, sister, mother, guardian – is also an unwitting player in a murderous feud played out in the shadows and margins of our world, and may prove to be its decisive weapon.
Metaphysical thriller, meditation on mortality and chronicle of our self-devouring times, this kaleidoscopic novel crackles with the invention and wit that have made David Mitchell one of the most celebrated writers of his generation. Here is fiction at its most spellbinding and memorable best.

full-as-much-heart:

The Bone Clocks, David Mitchell

September 2014. It’s coming…

One drowsy summer’s day in 1984, teenage runaway Holly Sykes encounters a strange woman who offers a small kindness in exchange for ‘asylum’.  Decades will pass before Holly understands exactly what sort of asylum the woman was seeking…

THE BONE CLOCKS follows the twists and turns of Holly’s life, from a scarred adolescence in Gravesend to old age on Ireland’s Atlantic coast as Europe’s oil supply dries up – a life not so far out of the ordinary, yet punctuated by flashes of precognition, visits from people who emerge from thin air and brief lapses in the laws of reality.  For Holly Sykes – daughter, sister, mother, guardian – is also an unwitting player in a murderous feud played out in the shadows and margins of our world, and may prove to be its decisive weapon.

Metaphysical thriller, meditation on mortality and chronicle of our self-devouring times, this kaleidoscopic novel crackles with the invention and wit that have made David Mitchell one of the most celebrated writers of his generation. Here is fiction at its most spellbinding and memorable best.


"Yeah, you heard me."




"Oui, souvent je songe à toi je te vois, au milieu de ta triste vie, rendue plus triste par moi, seule dans ton petit boudoir, seule dans ta maison, isolée dans ton coeur, qui n’a pour habitants que des ennuis et des chagrins que j’ai augmentés, mon Dieu ! que j’ai augmentés. Voilà ce que je me reproche sans cesse."
— Gustave Flaubert , Lettre à Louise Colet (via feuille-d-automne)

nevver:

Tattoo You

nevver:

Tattoo You



I thought you were more than just a shield.
Let’s see.

Laisse-moi t’apprendre le français, Cap’


"And yet (this was the murky part, this was what bothered me) there had also been other, way more confusing and fucked-up nights, grappling around half-dressed, weak light sliding in from the bathroom and everything haloed and unstable without my glasses: hands on each other, rough and fast, kicked-over beers foaming on the carpet - fun and not that big of a deal when it was actually happening, more than worth it for the sharp gasp when my eyes rolled back and I forgot about everything; but when we woke the next morning stomach-down and groaning on opposite sides of the bed it receded into an incoherence of backlit flickers, choppy and poorly lit like some experiment film, the unfamiliar twist of Boris’s features fading from memory already and none of it with any more bearing on our actual lives than a dream. We never spoke of it; it wasn’t quite real; getting ready for school, we threw shoes, splashed water at each other, chewed aspiring for our hangovers, laughed and joked around all the way to the bus stop."
The Goldfinch, Donna Tartt

Erwin-Schoettle Platz - Stuttgart (06/04/14)

Erwin-Schoettle Platz - Stuttgart (06/04/14)